Sprint-Review and Demo Checklist

At Tivix we use Agile software development methodologies adapted to our business of providing engineering and innovation services to our clients. One of the key tools we use to keep projects on track are sprint review and product demonstration (demo) meetings at the end of each sprint. These allow the full team, including business stakeholders on the client side, to see progress first hand. We’re usually taking software products from initial concept through launch, so it is exciting to see the pieces of a product fall into place every two weeks.

Checklists are awesome and the best way to be prepared for a successful sprint review meeting is to have one you run through the day before the important meeting.

Before Meeting

  • Compile list of all completed stories. (most PM tools make this very easy)

  • If the demo will be performed by more than one person, establish roles ahead of time.

  • Practice your demo, with a particular eye towards acceptance criteria and the definition of done. (note demo practice is separate from acceptance testing, but is a good second check)

  • Assess status of project plan / roadmap and prepare for the inevitable “are we on track?” question.

During Meeting

  • Demonstrate completed stories from the view of an end user. (explain all assumptions and use-cases, don’t just jump in without context)

  • Specifically review key decisions and why they were made.

  • Refer back to product roadmap or completion status of epics.

  • Keep on track and ensure feedback is related to the sprint scope – but be completely open to feedback even if it is critical of the team’s work.

After Meeting

  • Schedule any follow-up design sessions.

  • Update requirements documents.

  • Resolve any questions that may impede planning the next sprint.

In the Agile development process sprint review and demo meetings have two important goals: improving team workflow over the next sprint and determining ‘course correction’ design inputs into the product design itself. Successfully checking off the boxes above makes sure your meetings effectively tackle these two goals.